Fisherman, Community Participant; Someone in Between

24 04 2012

Cap’n J and I have been back in Sitka for a month now, blissing out on the pre-tourist calm. This is something I love about being up here early. Seasonal workers (yeah, like us) and visitors are a mere trickle in spring, rather than the flood of summer. Like bears snuffling their way out of hibernation, locals blink happily at the lengthening days, joking easily, relieved to have slipped through winter’s clammy fingers.

Sitkans know how to stay busy. Community events celebrate all manner of talent, and we’ve kept a full calendar since our return. The Sitka Film Society brought Salaam Dunk to town, a great film about an Iraqi girls’ basketball team. Performer Gene Tagaban shared a powerful evening of stories, music and dance. There was the Monthly Grind – a community-wide variety show that runs October-April – and an evening of live storytelling at the Larkspur Café.

All these things, and we even managed to go fishing. The Nerka spent 10 days away from the dock, as we tried our hand at winter king trolling. April’s ocean conditions are notoriously fickle; only weeks earlier, a friend awoke to his deck piled with snow, an icy skin on the water. Braced for the worst, we got the fantasy instead, re-entering our work life with flat calm water, gorgeous sunrises, and the occasional king salmon. Not even Bear could complain, sprawled on her bunk in a sunbeam. (Though she did get seasick when we first left the dock. Nothing like a glassy-eyed, mouth-foaming cat to make you feel like a terrible parent.)

Bear's kind of fishin': flat seas and sunny.

We’d have happily continued dragging our hooks around, but by the middle of this month, it was time to scrub the Nerka clean and switch gears. We’re jumping ship to longline on a friend’s boat, hoping to head out this week. Slowly progressing towards being ready, we spent much of Sunday loading halibut gear aboard. (The boat sat noticeably lower in the water, her nose sniffing the sky, after we were done.)

We’re here to make a living, I know, but I’m also hungry to make a life in Sitka. Every day, yet another flyer is tacked to the Backdoor Café’s bulletin board, promoting yet another tempting event. This week is no exception.

Monday was World Book Night, and Sitka’s unique method of spreading literary love earned a national shout-out in USA Today.

Isabella Brady will be honored on Tuesday evening, first with Alaska Native Sisterhood services (5 pm, ANB Hall), followed by cultural services that will continue late into the night (7 pm, Sheet’ka Kwaan Naa Kahidi).

Wednesday marks a different honoring, as Sitka’s Fish to Schools program is recognized as Alaska’s 2011-2012 Best Farm to Schools Program. Only on its second year, Fish to Schools connects local schools with local seafood. If you’re in Sitka, dinner is a not-to-be-missed meal by Ludvig’s Colette Nelson. Otherwise, you can still support Fish to Schools here.

On Thursday, community organizer Lakota Harden will lead a workshop, “Allies for Youth,” training adults to ally with youth for social change and developing leaders for the next generation. (9 am-noon; RSVP with Brian Sparks, 907.747.3370.) This one’s dear to my heart: my non-fishing path was as a social worker with Seattle’s homeless youth. While I can’t give up this life at sea, I miss social justice work, cultural conversations, the energy and resilience of young people.

But as I heard so often as a teenager, “We are here to catch fish and make money,” and you can’t catch fish if your hooks aren’t in the water. Given a self-sustaining bank account and no anxious skippers, I’d gladly sign my time over to all of these events, and more – experience assures me that Thursday’s tempting event will be followed by something equally fascinating on Friday, then Saturday, and on and on. The thing about fishing for a living is that – eventually – you have to leave the dock.

All this makes me curious… Is our little island town of 9000 special (well, yes), or are other communities equally rich with goings-on? With Hooked’s friends spread across such diverse geography, I wonder what it’s like where you live. Do you feel very connected to your community events? Which ones? How do you hear about them?

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6 responses

24 04 2012
keneumey

Smiles for the picture of Happy Bear!

30 04 2012
Tele

Yep – that was special for you, Kari! :)

24 04 2012
patriciasands

Living in Toronto there is no end to the list of events and happenings. Finding the time and $$$ to participate in all that interests you is the challenge. As big a city as it is, there is still a small town vibe in many ways and I love living here … although given a choice I would be in the south of France! Thanks for visiting on my blog today, Tele. You were a big hit!

30 04 2012
Tele

Thanks for this, Patricia – I’m fascinated by cities that are able to offer that small town vibe. I’ve heard such good reports of Toronto, will have to make it up to your area one of these days!

24 04 2012
Tom Jr

I really enjoy the feeling a smaller town puts off. The people (At times seem stand offish ) are truly great people with so much to share. I grew up in a small farming town and it was amazing. Now these days living in such a large city I have forgot how it feels to slow down and take things in . I am really excited to get to Alaska in a few weeks! Thank you for the post ! Bear looks very happy !

30 04 2012
Tele

I’ll be interested to hear your observations after you’ve gotten settled in, Tom! I suspect you’ll see some similarities to your childhood home… Slowing down is definitely one of the things I love about being back up here.




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